Under Pressure PressurePro

PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring System

We use the PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring System on our RV because we think it is the very best TPMS on the market. We love how easy it is to tell if and when we have a tire pressure/heat problem without constantly looking at a digital display. The system is well thought out and robustly constructed.

This post is a condensed version of our article Under Pressure which can be found here. Under Pressure.

PressurePro has solved our tire pressure monitoring issues. We now have a fully functional full-time monitor for our tire pressure and temperature that works perfectly. This has been a huge time saver and has solved a safety concern with help from PressurePro.

Before we drive the RV I measure the tire pressures every time. During each longer trip, I measured tire temperatures at rest stops to make sure that the temperatures stayed within safe operating temperatures.

This is what PressurePro does and a lot more. All I have to do is open the app on my phone and I get the specifics about each tire. I will leave it at that… it works great, it is hard to believe how good it works.

PressurePro screen capture showing a (simulated) blowout in the front tire of our car.

Here is a picture of the components of the system.

Here is a picture of the FX module installed in my RV dashboard.

The flashing red PP circle on the FX module indicates that I have a serious tire problem. Usually the PP is dark indicating that everything is normal.

Installation

Robust wheel sensors are installed replacing the stem caps on each wheel. These sensors transmit the information to the Pulse FX receiver module located on my dashboard right next to my gauges. The face of my module is directly in my line of sight. Attached to the Pulse FX module is the power cord, plugged into a 12-volt outlet and an antenna cable. I put the antenna under my RV mounted vertically (vertical mounting is important) near the rear tires. Running the antenna cable through my firewall along the frame to the antenna location was by far the hardest part of my install. That was it, install complete.

No Display?

That is right no display, the Pulse FX module on my dash is the best display. If the face of the Pulse FX flashes red, I have a problem.

My Other Display

My phone is the other display. The picture at the top of the post is a screenshot taken from my phone. If I get a new phone, my old phone could be a full-time display. Do I need a full-time display? I have a full-time display right on the Pulse FX module. I don’t need to have the phone display turned on while I am driving, because the Pulse FX module gives me constant monitoring.

Warnings

As a side note, warnings are not instantaneous, meaning that a full blowout could occur a few seconds before the Pulse FX module turns red. If the blowout is on our car, and we are towing it at the time, the Pulse FX module may be the only way we know we had a blowout. I have seen pictures of tow cars that have been towed for miles without the RV owner ever knowing that the tow car had a blowout.

My phone serves as a good part-time display when I want to check the tire pressure before a trip and while driving my phone can give me real-time information about changes that occur. The phone even has alerts on the operation of the car tires when I am looking at the PressurePro app RV information screen. The Alert system also works when the PressurePro App is running in the background.

This alert screen happened on my primary screen (the RV display) when I took a sensor off my car identifying a critical under pressure situation. Then my car display looked like this.

PressurePro screen capture showing a (simulated) blowout in the front tire of our car.
PressurePro screen capture showing a (simulated) blowout in the front tire of our car.

The same thing would have happened had I been looking at the car information screen and had I removed the sensor from the RV.

A similar alert would have happened if I had been looking at a different screen on my phone, say a map display when the event happened.

Alerts

The Pulse FX module on my dashboard shows the alerts by turning red. You can’t see it in this picture, but for an alert, the Pulse FX module flashes red. When the pressure falls 24% below the reference pressure you will get a critical alert and the Pulse FX module will flash very fast. If the pressure falls 12.5% below the reference pressure (slow leak) the Pulse FX module will flash at a slower rate. A slow Pulse FX module flash rate indicates that you need to increase air pressure in the tires.

When the FX flashes red, my phone also announces the alert with a notification tone anytime the PressurePro application is open. The details of the failure are on my phone.

While Driving

I took the following screenshot from my phone of the RV display after we were driving. As you can see the pressure and temperature increased from the cold reference pressure of 105 up to 114. When we were driving, the pressures were even higher at about 120-psi. The temperature has also cooled down to only about ten degrees above the outside air temperature. In this screen-capture, the sun was on the driver’s side of the RV and you can easily see the temperature difference.

Sensors

All the sensors are factory sealed against all moisture. Given this fact, you cannot replace the batteries. They transmit on a discrete radio frequency that will not interfere with your car tire pressure system. The sensors are designed to conserve battery life and only transmit a short distance. They transmit a pulse every 7 seconds also to conserve battery life. The sensors send the pulse every seven seconds even when they are not on the tires so removing the sensors will not improve battery life.

According to PressurePro the batteries in the sensors should last several years. One thing that will help improve battery life is to keep the sensors cool.

About the FX Module

The Pulse FX module takes data from up to 40 tires at a time (perhaps more depending on how it is configured). The pressure range for the system is between 8 & 215 PSI. The Pulse FX module is powered by my RV 12-volt system and runs 24 hours per day. When the blue LED light on the module is solid it is paired with my phone. When the blue LED light is flashing, it is ready to pair. Honestly, I don’t look at the blue LED, but rather my phone will tell me when it is paired. One minor limitation is that the Pulse FX module can only pair to one device at a time. This limitation is a Bluetooth issue.

Final Thoughts on Tire Care

I have several thoughts at the end of this post. First, I want to take all necessary precautions while we enjoy the freedom of full-time travel. I also believe that nearly all tire problems are preventable. PressurePro goes in the prevention category.

Here is a direct link to the product. PressurePro FX

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