Campsite Review Claytor Lake

Campsite Review: Claytor Lake

Campsite Review: Claytor Lake State Park Campground is located southwest of Roanoak Virginia on the north side of Claytor Lake. The nearest city big enough to have the most services is Roanoak, Virginia. Claytor Lake State Park Campground has easy access and a boat launch on Claytor Lake. There are 106 water and electric hookup RV campsites at the campground.

Our RV in Site D30
Our RV in Site D30

Claytor Lake is a very nice campground. Claytor Lake State Park is one of the nicest state parks we have visited.

Here is a link to the article we published while staying at Claytor Lake State Park. Two Virginias

Details

Website:  Claytor Lake State Park Campground

Online Reservations: Reserve America

Reservations: 800-933-7275 Reservations are highly recommended and probably mandatory for weekends.

Phone Number: 540-643-2500 Ranger Station

Address: 4400 State Park Rd, Dublin VA 24084

From Interstate 81 turn south on State Park Road three miles to the park.

Link to Google Map for the area: Claytor Lake State Park Campground

Season: Last Friday in March to the first Monday in December

Dates stayed: August 19 -22, 2021

Comfort: The temperatures were between 65 and 85 in August. Hot and muggy with afternoon thunderstorms.

Elevation: 1917′

Our site: #D30 pull-through Electric and water hookups

Check-out time 1 pm, arrivals 4 pm.

Price Paid: $20.00 per night with Virginia Disabled Veterans Discount

Hook-ups: Electric 30 amp only and water hookups in the D loop.

Dump station: Yes

Restrooms: Yes

Shower: Yes

Laundry: No

Potable Water: Yes

Water to fill your RV storage tank: Yes

Cell service: AT&T average signal, requires a booster for data speed – Verizon voice-only even with a booster

Observations

Campsite Review: Claytor Lake State Park Campground insider info:

Claytor Lake State Park Campground is divided into four loops. Only the D loop has electricity. Loops A & B are to the west of the main entrance. Loop A has a large incline and sharper turns inside the loop which would make a large RV difficult to park. Loops A-C are under tree cover which would inhibit solar panels.

View of site D31 from the front window of our RV.
View of sited D31 -34 from the front window of our RV.

All sites in this campground are gravel and most will fit large RVs.

The D loop with electric hookup campsites is a 30-amp service. All campsites in the D loop are big enough for any size RV. Sites D28-34 are pull-through sites that are all line up like cars in a traffic jam. The trees provide ample afternoon shade to sites D28-34. When I first saw site D30 I was perplexed as to why anyone would design parking this way. After being there for two days I decided that these sites, especially site D28 were the best in the D loop. The view from the side of our RVs biggest windows was directly into the forest.

The next best sites in the D loop are probably D3-6 and are tucked in the trees. I would avoid site number D6 due to the oddly located dump station.

Bonus

Claytor Lake State Park is very refined and is a very nice facility. It is well developed. There are dirt and paved hiking and bicycle trails. The shoreline of the lake includes a nice swimming area. There are Yurts and cabins for rent. In the marina area, you can rent boats.

On Saturday evening, during the summer there is a small live band that plays for a couple of hours. On the day we were there the band was very good.

Site layouts and Satellite View

Claytor Lake State Park Campground Layout Loop C & D

Claytor Lake State Park Campground Layout Loop C & D. In this image north is at the bottom.

Claytor Lake State Park Campground Layout Loop A & B In this image north is at the bottom.
Claytor Lake State Park Campground Satellite View Loop D
Satellite View Loop D. In this image north is at the top.

2 thoughts on “Campsite Review: Claytor Lake”

  1. We have not stayed in state parks in our RV mainly because of the size. Noted this one would work. Also, Mother Neff State Park in Texas would work if you are ever out this way. By the way, Mother Neff was the first State Park. Keep it between the storms!

    1. So far we have been lucky enough to fit in nearly every place we have chosen to stop.

      I remember clearly a commercial RV park in North Dakota that was nothing but a muddy slope with a certain slide to the bottom had we tried to park there.

      In southern Utah, there was a place that was so bad I had to dig a trench next to the front tire so that my stairs were below ground level after I parked.

      State Parks are so nice and worth the risk.

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